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Wellesley College News 

Entered as second-class matter November 17, 1916, at the Post Office at Wellesley Branch, Boston, Mass., under tha act of March 8, 1879. 



VOL. XXIX. 



WELLESLEY, MASS.,MARCH 16, 1921. 



No. 21 



RUMMAGE SALE FOR BENEFIT OF Four Classes Vie In Competition For Best 6LEE CLUB GOES TO PHILADEL- 
FUND HELD IN NEW YORK ^ • • i D1 d PHIA TO GIVE CONCERT FOR 

AND ROCHESTER ° ri S lnal Fla ^ at Barn DRIVE 



Prof. Macdougall and Others to Take 
Part in Publicity Work 



A CAMPUS TEA-ROOM 
TO BE OPENED 



The sale of organdy flowers at the 
Campus Exchange has netted enough 
money for the opening of a campus 
tea-room. This sale has been in the 
hands of the General Aid Committee 
and they have for some time been 
considering the possibility of opening 
a tea-room. With the funds now on 
hand the Committee hopes to start 
the venture soon after Spring vaca 
tion. "It will not be an elaborate af- 
fair," said Lucy Thorn, chairman of 
the Committee, but merely a place to 
buy tea and cookies here on campus. 
We will sell wafers and cookies, not 
fudge cake. We can't afford that. In 
the Spring there will be iced tea. The 
Tea-room will be an extension ot tnt 
Campus Exchange, and its support 
must come from the student body. 



'21 CARRIES UEi HONORS WITH FARODY OiN TRAGEDY OF NAN 



$1400! That's what the New York 
Wellesley Club's Rummage Sale 
cleared! And not a rag left over ex- 
cept three old coats! "Let us judge 
whether your discarded stuff is worth 
anything," begged the indefatigable 
Josie Belle Herbert, and what she did- 
n't unearth! Placards announcing the 
sale appeared from the Bowery to 
East River and the folks who came 
one day to buy jelly glasses protested 
they would return the next for fire- 
less cookers wherewith to make use of 
their first purchases. One Wellesley 
dame donated two of her husband's 
perfectly good suits and, later, after 
a supposed conflict with her spouse 
sent hurried word that she desired to 
buy the suits back. One suit had al- 
ready been sold and while frenzied 
salesgirls made frantic efforts to help 
tbeiv college ? ; stev ^-rpep thp suit. » 
maid appeared from the donor. Eve- 
ry time the poor woman opened her 
mouth some nervous girl with visions 
of an angry, sheet enwrapped man, in- 
terrupted her with, "We've no time to 
attend to you now. Later — perhaps — 
Later — " and when the unwelcome 
creature finally did succeed in making 
herself heard, she said, "Please, Mrs. 
— says if it's all right she don't want 
to buy them suits back after all." The 
negress departed in state, leaving the 
committee in a state of collapse. Had 
hubby relented — bought another suit 
— decided to spend his remaining days 
in bed? The girls were too weak to 
inquire. 

And then there was the affair of 
(Continued on page 4, col. 1) 



Th interclass competition held at 
the Barn Saturday evening, March 12, 
proved a uniformly successful way of 
entertaining the college. The senior 
class presenting the "Tragedy of 
Nan," brought up-to-date, was ac- 
corded the victory. '24 came in a 
close second with the "Trials of a 
Hostess" and would perhaps have won 
had the performance not gone over the 
allotted time. '23 won third place, 
and '22 achieved "the hole in the 
doughnut." 

Rebecca Hill repeated her tragic in- 
terpretation of Nan with all the old 
intensity of passion. The Barn has 
never witnessed a more complete de- 
scent "from the sublime to the ridic- 
ulous." Even in the original play 
there were no more pathetic tones 
heard than when she sighed, "I'd rath- 



er be passing fair than flunking out." 
The parody, while following Mase- 
field's lines closely, managed to bring 
in local hits highly amusing to the 
audience. Elizabeth Richards as Jen- 
ny coyly asked, "Do 'e fancy a-a Bab- 
son baby?" When Dick (Wilhelmine 
Bayless) asked Nan to take down her 
hair, she first carefully removed a 
hairnet and much "stuffing" where- 
upon he exclaimed "Strange fish in the 
nets, tonight." When the audience 
was not laughing at the rest of the 
actors, it was watching the expression 
of Eugenia Brown as Gaffer, absent- 
ly strumming a stringless ukelele. 

The junior stunt was intended to be 

symbolic of the college girl, crude 

when she enters and no better when 

she leaves. Thus Martha Hanna, the 

(Continued on page 5, col. 2) 



MISS MAK&L CUMMiJNGS 
APPOINTED DIRECTOR OF 
DEPARTMENT OF HYGIENE 



THE ERASMUS HISTORY PRIZE 

AGAIN OFFERED TO SENIORS 

WRITING BEST PAPERS 



Miss Vivian Will Return to 
Mathematics Department 



Rules For Competition 
Now Announced 



Miss Mabel L. Cummings, a gradu- 
ate,^ the Boston Normal School of 
Gymnastics, has been appointed Di- 
rector of the Department of Hygiene, 
and will enter upon her duties in Sep- 
tember, 1921. She has been a student 
in Tufts Medical School, in Chicago 
and other universities, and has had a 
wide experience in different fields of 
hygiene and physical education, as in- 
structor, supervisor, writer and lectur- 
er. For several years Miss Cummings 
has been Director of the Department 
of Physical Education at the Univer- 
sity of Oregon. The College is fortun- 
ate in securing a woman of such broad 
experience, Who at the same time re- 
ceived her early training under Miss 
Homans at the Boston Normal School 
of Gymnastics. 

The May Circular of Courses of In- 
struction will indicate certain elective 
courses which, when given, are to be 
conducted by the Director, and she 
will also have definite charge of Hy- 
giene 120, with the assistance of lec- 
tures by members of the department 
and others not officially connected with 
the department. The elective courses 
now offered make it possible for grad- 
uate students who entered in Septem- 
ber, 1920, to fulfill the residence re- 
quirements for the M. A. degree and 
achieve all or part of the thesis during 
two years of residence as candidates 

(Continued on page 2, col. 4) 



The Department of " History an- 
nounces that the Erasmus History 
Prize will again be awarded at the 
graduation exercises this year for the 
best paper on an historical subject by 
a meiubar of the senior class. 

The following rules have been 
adopted to govern the competition: — 

1. All papers must be left at room 
118, Founders Hall, not later than 
12:00 roon, Mondpy, May 23. 

2. Competitors must submit three 
typewritten copies of their papers. 
Each copy must be signed by a pseu- 
donym and must be accompanied with 
a sealed envelope containing the 
author's real name and pseudonym. 

3. All papers must be properly doc- 
umented, must contain a critical bib- 
liography, and must be based, so far 
as possible", upon source material. 

The award will be made by a commit- 
tee consisting of two members of the 
Department of Hisory and a member 
of the Department of English Litera- 
ture. 

For further information, application 
should be made to members of the De- 
partment of History. 

The Erasmus History Prize, which 
was established by a member of the 
class of 1920 was awarded last year 
to Elizabeth H. Cox, for a paper en- 
titled, "The Emperor Trajan in Me- 
dieval Legends." 



Combined Concert with Haverford 
College Received Great Applause 



The complete success scored by the 
Glee Club in its point concert with the 
Haverford Glee Club on March 11, has 
filled the college with admiration for 
the organization, not merely as an in- 
strument for the Drive but as a capa- 
ble and worthy organization in itself. 

The Wellesley Glee Club went to 
Philadelphia on the invitation of the 
Wellesley Club of that city, which ar- 
ranged the concert in the ballroom *>f 
the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in conec- 
tion with the Glee Club from Haver- 
ford College. 

The excellency and quality of the 
singing was widely commented upon, 
but more noticeable still was the per- 
fect team work in all incidents. Only 
most favorable criticism was received. 

Mr. Wister Comfort, President of 
Haverford College made an address 
during the intermission for the bene- 
fit of the Wellesley Endowment Fund. 
He made the encouraging remark that 
Haverford raised a fund proportion- 
ately large with success. The number 
of Pennsylvania students in Wellesley, 
he went on to say, gave an indication 
of the interest which would no doubt 
lead to a hearty response to the Drive. 
To impress the great need of an En- 
dowment Fund he stated that the min- 
imum salary at Haverford is $1500 
greater than the maximum at Welles- 
ley. 

The students were entertained h. 
homes of members of the Wellesley 
Club. Various functions were arranged 
for them, a drive through the city and 
tea at Bryn Mawr, given by Wellesley 
Alumnae, graduate students. Satur- 
day a luncheon was arranged where 
the Glee Club charmed the Alumnae 
by singing old and new college songs 

Mrs. Helen Foss Woods presided 
and spoke of the details of the local 
campaign. A message was brought 
from headquarters by Professor Hart 
who explained the present state of the 
Endowment Fund and made a forceful 
and effective appeal to the local work- 
ers. 

A second concert was given Satur- 
day afternoon, March 13, in the High 
School Auditorium at Morristown, N. 
J. This was equally supported by Wel- 
lesley Alumnae and friends and was 
equally as successful as the Philadel- 
phia performance. 

Both the Alumnae and the thirty 
members of the Glee Club who gave 
the concert are to be congratulated on 
the splendid management of the whole 
trip which resulted in an unprecedent- 
ed success. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



WtUt&ltp College Jletog 



BOARD OP EDITORS 
Associate Editors 
CLEMEWELL HINCHLIFF, 1921 
ELIZABETH SAYRE, 1921 

Assistant Editors 
ALICE HACKETT, 1921 
ELEANOR PERRET, 1921 
DOROTHEA COMLY, 1922 
BEATRICE JEFFERSON, 1922 
EMILIE WEYL, 1922 
ELIZABETH WOODY, 1922 
DOROTHY WILLIAMS, 192* 
MARGARET HOOGS, 1923 
ELIZABETH SANFORD, 1923 
HELEN STAHL, 1923 

DANE VERMILION, 1923 
LOUISE CHILD, 1924 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
MARY C. DOOLY, 1921 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
DOROTHY BRIGHT, 1921 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Circulation Manager 
GLADYS MANSIR, 1921 

Advertising Manager 

SUSAN GRAFFAM, 1922 

Assistant Business Managers 

BARBARA BATES, 1922 
LUCY JOHNSON, 1923 
RUTH WHITE, 1923 



Published weekly during the college year by a board of students of Wellesley College. 
Subscriptions one dollar and seventy-five cents per annum in advance. Single copies six 
cents each. All contributions should be in the News office by 9 P. M. on Sunday at the 
latest and should be addressed to Miss Mary Dooly. All Alumnae news should be sent to 
Miss Laura Dwight, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. All business communications and 
subscriptions should be sent to the Wellesley College News, Wellesley, Mass. 

Entered as second-class matter, October 10, 1919, at the Post Office at Wellesley Branch, 
Boston, Mass., under the Act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized October 80, 1919. 

MAUGUS PRESS, PRINTERS, WELLESLEY, MASS. 



NON-MORAL REGULATIONS 
AND THE HONOR SYSTEM 



The approaching election of next 
year's officers causes one to think se- 
riously concerning the college prob- 
lems they will have to face. A car- 
dinal question, and one ^/hich demands 
the sanest thought, is the honor sys- 
tem. Comprehension of the different 
res of this system is necessary 
y student concerned next year in 
>-e government. It is hoped here 
cime unemphasized. 
_;scuss an aspect of the case up to 

Many an ardent supporter of "Equal 
Rights" has replied, when asked 
about the possible success of an honor 
system, "Men's colleges have succeed- 
ed, why not Wellesley?" We respect 
the independence that prompts the 
remark. We cannot but feel, however, 
that its logic is fallacious. 

It will be found on examination, 
that prominence is given,, in the honor 
system of Princeton, for instance, to 
the matter of cheating. And cheating 
is in itself, even if no rule of Prince- 
ton making forbade it, a dishonorable 
thing. Young men have not been ac- 
customed, at home, to accept cribbing 
in examinations as the natural course 
of procedure. In supporting the hon- 
or system they are supporting laws 
which hold everywhere and whose 
rationality they have felt always. 

The Wellesley honor system in- 
cludes of course, the problem of cheat- 
ing. But this case of actual dishon- 
esty is swamped under regulations of 
a peculiarly collegiate nature. Thert 
is nothing inherently wrong; for ex- 
ample, in going to a dance without a 
chaperon. Until they came to college 
most of the students never thought of 
troubling over chaperons at all. There 
is nothing unethical, per se, in going 
to town without filling out a slip of 
white paper. It is granted that the 
rules on these subjects were passed 
for the good of the college. The fact 
remains that were there no such leg- 
islation, no moral wrong would be 
committed in doing the acts which the 
laws at present forbid. The only 



thing unethical in breaking college 
rules is that in doing so a Rule is 
broken. 

The inference to be drawn from thi^ 
analysis is obvious. An honor system 
restraining acts in themselves dishoi. 
orable. like cheating, is reinforced by 
all the past training of the students, 
by all the traditions of the gentleman, 
by all their sense indeed of honor. A 
system demanding allegiance to rules 
almost all of which put new and un- 
accustomed restrictions on the stu- 
dent body faces a far more serious 
problem. The difficulty is aggravated 
in that some members of the college 
cannot grant the rationality of many 
of the laws they must obey. 

It is not impossible that young 
women have a sense of honor suffi- 
ciently in advance of that required of 
men, to stand the added strain. It 
seems apparent, at any rate, that the 
college has taken the question much 
too lightly. Desirability of a system 
more restricted in scope might be con- 
sidered. Means for making the stu- 
dents realize the advantages of the 
rules, so that their reason may rein- 
force their honor, might be found. For 
it must be admitted that at present 
the Wellesley honor system places too 
severe a strain on some of its would- 
be supporters. 



ree rress 



Col 



umn 



THE EXAMINATION IN 
PSYCHOLOGY 101 



The lecturers in Psychology 101 
heartily approve the giving of space 
and encouragement by the College 
News to students who wish to discuss 
academic matters. Little is lost ana 
much may be gained by frank discus- 
sion; "submerged complexes" are as> 
detrimental to group-thinking as to 
individual thinking. Hence for fear 
we should have submerged complexes 
ourselves, we have decided not to 
meet with silence the comments in re- 
cent numbers of the News on the ex- 
amination in the course. 



Our first remarks are statistical in 
nature. Though catastrophe befell the 
class, the members on the upper levels 
were not involved. 104 students had 
quiz averages in the A and high-B 
zone- Of these 13 made A in the 
course, 58 made B, 31 made C, only 
two made D and none failed. Thus 
about 30% of the best students "fell 
down" to some extent on the examin- 
ation. This is the common lot of col- 
lege classes, not an unparalleled dis- 
aster. Of the whole class, a trifle more 
than 25% received high credit in the 
course, since a number of girls with 
low-B quiz averages and a C examin- 
ation made B in virtue of the labora- 
tory work. This is about the proper 
percentage according to inter-Univer- 
sity standards for large classes in ele- 
ir.entary work. But according to 
these same standards only one fourth 
of the class should fall below C. Near- 
ly—not quite — a third of the students 
in this class fell below credit, includ- 
ing the 32 girls who failed. Why? 

Was it because the examination dif- 
fered so much from the quizzes? We 
have heard rumors that the students 
had decided beforehand that they 
would not have the type of examination 
actually given because it was used last 
year. Be this as it may, the examina- 
tion required primarily that the stu- 
dents should recognize in the experi- 
ence of the heroine of a story, certain 
phenomena which they had been 
studying. Surely if one understands 
what a thing is, one ought to know it 
when one sees it, whether it be a jay 
or a judgment. And "t was the judg- 
ment, the general notion, and experi- 
ences of relation which wrecked this 
class — not any mysterious interaction 
of colors. 

Parenthetically, it may be lament- 
able that selves are conscious of colors 
and sounds and orders and that it is 
impossible to understand the self 
without knowing something of its ac- 
tivities. Such is, however, the case. 
Nor have we any apologies for having 
reminded our students that the human 
self is merely the last in a long course 
of evolution beginning with the hum- 
ble "amoeba." 

Evidently, however, the examination 
did produce an emotional shock — a 
kind of panic — in which some excellent 
students lost their heads. It was Sat- 
urday afternoon and everyone was 
jaded. We had had in mind the stric- 
tures of those who object to an exam- 
ination which puts a premium fcn 
"memorizing" and in avoiding the 
rock we fell into the whirlpool. 
• We have not space here to discuss 
at any length the virtues and defects 
of the Army-test method of examin- 
ing large classes. But the writer of 
the first communication emphasizes 
the "filling in of blanks" and com- 
plains that no opportunity for appli- 
cation was given. In the five written 
lessons of one division, 88 blanks were 
given as against 179 cases in which 
the students were required to make 
applications of their knowledge. Ana 
as to "blanks," what is the difference 
whether one asks in traditional form, 
"What are the instincts which make 
us scholars?" or demands "The in- 
stincts which make us scholars are — , 



and — ?" So far as we can see, merely 
that the answer is set in a definite 
place on the page where the reader 
can find it more quickly. After read- 
ing many papers, one gets a sort of 
instantaneous recognition impossible 
where the space-form is variable. And 
did the quizzes give no training to 
girls "in expressing themselves in ex- 
act psychological terms?" Is it no 
practice in exactness of expression to 
be obliged to give precisely the term 
which completes a meaning? 

With the writer of the second com- 
munication, we are in considerable 
agreement. One semester is too little 
for the mastery of Psychology or any 
other subject. Large lecture divisions 
certainly have serious drawbacks. But 
the fact that a lecturer must appeal 
for special attention from knitters and 
letter-writers is a reflection on the 
student body rather than on the ad- 
ministration of the course. 

Beside the panic we have another 
explanation to offer the "catastrophe." 
The quiz marks had run too high for 
safety — not (in our opinion) on ac- . 
count of the nature of the tests but 
because they came about every two 
weeks and dealt with work still fresh 
in memory. The point is that good or 
fair marks lulled the students into 
thinking they were safe. Knowing 
the brevity of the conferences, both of 
us held office hours nearly all day be- 
fore the examination and all morning 
of the fatal day. Our gates were fre- 
quented by a few fine students (who 
all had A or B on their quizzes and 
now have one or the other to adorn 
their cards) but only one who was 
trembling on the brink appeared. 
Among those conspicuous for their ab- 
sence were certain young ladies who 
had had personal invitations to be 
present. We believe that many mem- 
bers of the class were resting on their 
oars and trusting to the current of 
events to sweep them over the shoals. 
A bon voyage in Course 102! The 
sailing is no safer yet we can proph- 
esy that the harbor-entrance will not 
be strewn with wrecks. 

E. A. McC. Gamble. 
H. B. English. 



MISS MABEL CUMMINGS 
(Continued from page 1, col. 2) 



for the certificate, since the required 
course 321, as it will be given in 1921- 
1922, will count three hours for the 
M. A. degree, as does t~he elective 
course 322. A seminary course, 323, 
conducted by the Director and mem- 
bers of the department gives the pos- 
sibility of further credits. 

The addition of these courses and 
certain adjustments in the work for 
the certificate became essential in Sep- 
tember, 1918, when the requirement 
went into effect, that all students ad- 
mitted as candidates for the certificate 
of the department should hold a Bach- 
elor's degree from an approved college 
or complete the five year course at 
Wellesley. These problems have de- 
manded a large part of the time of the 
present Director, who now returns to 
the department of Mathematics, hav- 
ing earned the gratitude of the Col- 
(Continued on page 3) 






THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




Blouses, Gowns, 
Suits, Coats, Skirts, 
Sweater Coats, Silk 
Petticoats and Furs. 



Meyer J 



onasson 



& Co. 



BOSTON 
'Tremont and Boylston Sts< 



MISS MABEL CUMMMINGS 
(Continued from page 2) 



lege for the way in which she has met 
the problems of the transition and has 
perfected the organization of the de- 
partment. 



We are all acquainted with the well- 
known expression "Girls will be girls," 
but what is the world coming to when 
it changes to "Boys will be girls!" A 
very well-taged answer to this rather 
perplexing question will be given at 
the Maugus Club, in Wellesley Hills, 
on Friday, March 18, when the Pi Eta 
Society of Harvard will present the 
three act comedy, "The Late Mr. 
Kidd," by W. Barton Leach, Jr., of 
Brookline. Many will recall last 
year's big hit, "Al Fareedah," and to 
these the engagement of the Pi Eta 
Theatricals does not hesitate to say 
that this year's production will sur- 
pass "Al Fareedah" in almost every 
effect. The lyrics, which are clever 
and bright, are the work of W. A. 
Duerr, of Brooklyn, N. Y., W. H. 
Cary, Jr., of New York City, H. K. 
Behn of Phoenix, Arizona, and the 
author of the book. The music this 
year is so good that it has been turner 
into a double-side dance record to be 
on sale at all performances. It was 
written by Lewis A. Harlow, Malcolm 
H. Dill, W. B. Leach, and H. E. Scott, 
Jr. 

It seems a far cry from the intoxi- 
cating cigarette manufactured by the 
firm of Theobald & Dunlap, Inc., to 
the ghost of Captain Kidd, and to the 
little tropical island of Tambelo, but 
the author has woven the three in to a 



clever and amusing plot. 

The action is brightened by the am- 
orous Theobald, who makes love to 
every available female, and whose cig- 
arettes have a most marvelous effect 
on Mark Antony, the negro butler. 
The sudden appearance in the first act 
of escaped jail-birds, late of Yale, 
threatens to disrupt the peaceful 
course of events, but they assume and 
maintain until the end false identities, 
a fact which leads to some extraordin- 
ary situations. 

The curtain rises at 7:30 P. M. To 
take the Wellesley members of the 
audience home after the performanct, 
special cars have been provided. Miss 
Pendleton is to be one of the many 
prominent patronesses. 

The cast is as follows: — 
Theobald Dunlap, of Theobald & Dun- 
lap, Inc H. K. Behn 
Hilda, "She Loved Him So! 

Wilson Palmer 
Professor Arthur Dubb of the Univer- 
sity of Georgia D. T. Eaton 

ANDREW J. LLOYD CO. 



The Andrew J. Lloyd Company store 
at 75 Summer Street, Boston, is very 
conveniently located for Wellesley Col- 
lege students. At this store you will 
find all sorts of eyeglasses and spec- 
tacles, especially the student's shell 
spectacles, kodaks, films, developing 
and printing, student's fountain pens, 
pencils especially the kind with the 
ring to be worn with a cord or ribbon, 
Bird Glasses, in fact, everything in 
the optical line. Other stores at 315 
Washington Street, 165 Tremont 
Street, 310 Boylston Street. Adv. 



DEARBORN HATS 

Hats that are Distinctive 

at Moderate Prices 

SARAH JANE DEARBORN 

100 Boylston Street, Boston 




Rufus Dubb, assistant to his father 

W. B. Leach, Ji. 
Barbara, the ward of Prof. Dubb, 

H. E. Scott, Jr. 
Mrs. Gwendolyn Dubb, first member 
of the Dubb household, 

A. A. Fiske, Jr. 
Mark Anthony, negro butler and con- 
spirator R. S. Flynn 
Tai Lo, descendant of Captain Kidd 

Malcolm H. Dill 

Boozer Bill Burton, A. B. (Yale '17), 

A. W. 0. L. M. V. M. Fawcett 

Steve the Sticker, A. B. (Atlanta '20) 

Philip Cheney 
The Ghost of Captain Kidd 

W. H. Kenyon, Jr. 

The Soothsayer A. H. Maclntyre 

The Rajah, Chief of the bandit rulers 

of Tambelo P. O. Chalmers 

Sadie, of Woolworth's L. B. Ellis 

PR KoRooTT,a fflLg a?? 
Ponies— W. J. Young, R. E. Larsen, T. 
R. Thayer, A. S. Ellsworth, R. B. 
Hovey, J. E. Eaton, Mr. 
Chorus Girls— E. I. Damon, E. V. Otis, 
S. W. Fordyce, W. J. Means, L. 
D. Hill, M. S. Jones. 
Men— Paul Palmer, Donald Oenslager, 
Richard Wait, J. M. Phillips, H. 
T. Sears, C. A. Gage. 

CHRISTIANITY IS 
"PROPAGANDA OF DEED" 




Head of Boston Settlement House 
Speaks on Work in Orient 



"Propaganda is one of the most es- 
sential principles of Christianity," 
said Mr. Charles A. Woods, at the C. 



M. H. Dill, the beautiful heroine of 

1921 PI ETA Show, "The Late Mr. 

Kidd." 

A. meeting in Billings Hall, last Wea- 
nesday night. Mr. Woods, head of 
South End Settlement House in Bos- 
ton, has just returned from a trip 
around the world, during which he 
made a careful study of social and re- 
ligious conditions. As most of his 
time was spent in the Far East, Mr. 
Woods was well qualified to speak or^ 
"Social Conditions in the Orient." His 
conception of Christianity as a kind 
of propaganda was most interesting, 
for it was in this light that he con- 
nected it with social work. "That 
Christianity and social work," said 
Mr. Woods, "go hand in hand, Christ 
demonstrated the truth of his doctrine 
by doing the good deed." 



NEW SPRING TIME MODELS 



HATS AND DRESSES for all Occasions 



D 



resses 



in Tricotine, Canton Crepe 
Taffeta and Georgette 

$16.50 up 
HATS $8.50 to $15.00 
MLLE. DREVET 
80 Boylston Street 



Room 318 



Little Building 





~j\jrn/et 


cfa 




HATS 


Our new Spring hats, in all the 
straws and silks in fashion this sea- 
son, are ready for you, in your choice 
of style and color, at low cost. 






Come in the next time you are in 
town. 

BOSTON 




Sixty-five — Sixty-nine Summer Street 



4 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



RUMMAGE SALE 
(Continued from page 1, col. 1) 

the three hats! A bunch of straws so 
bedraggled that the wonder was they 
could have existed so long puzzled 
the committee. "Nobody'll ever takt 
these,' sighed the marekr and slapped 
them down with a 5c label. Listen! 
This is good! Along came an old 
lady who bought five. "My daugh- 
ter's going to Vassar," said she, "and 
I want to fix her up. Haven't much 
to do it with. La — there's a dollar 
and a quarter's worth of velvet there. 
You won't know these when I get 
through steaming and cutting," and 
again the limp committee against t'jJe 
wal: considered visions of the Vassar 
daughter — perhaps a little thankful 
they were not helping the hats to re- 
turn to Wellesley "You'll never know 
'em," the old lady reiterated, and the 
girls fervently hoped she spoke truly. 
Rochester has also used the Run, 
mage Sale with success, clearing $125 
the first day. 

The Eastern Maine Wellesley Club 
recently held an exhibition of cover- 
lids. An admission was charged and 
the affair was extremely successful. It 
is amazing how many antiques and 
curiosities are housed in even the 
smallest communities. A lean collec- 
tion of this kind can be most profit- 
ably arranged in any hotel parlor or 
schoolroom. It is suggested as an un- 
dergraduate activity during Easter 
ition. 

very Wellesley husband or father 
ing the cause is received into thfc 
[] with great acclaim. One modern 
Bttyr is a Wellesley father who reg- 
ularly carried from New York to the 
Madison, N. J. Wellesley tea room six 
dozen English muffins as his share of 
the work. John Wilson (husband of 
Anne Brinton, '10), has contributed 
this attractive Wellesley Garden 

verse: 

"A double measure of garden treasure 

With the se Wellesley seed you'll bu y, 

YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised or 
constructively criticised by successful 
authors? If you do, then send us your 
manuscript (stories, articles or po- 
ems). We will criticise, and place 
ithem should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
.services. If, however, you have not 
■previously enrolled with the advisory 
.department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
-of two dollars, which we must ask of 
'each new contributor There is no 
■additional expense, no future obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
■something today! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 

ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 39th St. 

New York City 

Advisory Department 



The summer showers will bring you 

flowers, 
Blue as the summer sky. 
When these have faded, the cause you 

aided 
Lives — though the flowers die. 

Speaking of gardens, Cleveland 
has ordered 500 packets of Wellesley 
blue flowers at 45c per package and is 
putting them in white envelopes with 
blue stickers for Easter sale. Appeal- 
ing flower baskets are also being ar- 
ranged. How many packets are you 
selling in your town? 

Wellesley's beloved Professor Mac- 
dougall writes he is "all het up about 
the Fund" and to prove it is going to 
spend his spring vacation giving 
speeches and recitals in Detroit, In- 
dianapolis, St. Louis, Kansas City, St. 
Jose and Des Moines. It is hoped Miss 
Bates will be able to do some speak- 
ing for the cause later. Marion Per- 
rin Burton continues her good work 
in the West; Katherine Hughes is 
scheduled for speeches in Morristown, 
N. J. and other points adjacent to 
New York. Mr. Greene has made two 
successful talks in Buffalo and Roches- 
ter and the reports are that the Buf- 
falo Rotary Club and Eastman Kodak 
Plant sat up and took notice when Mr. 
Greene said, "I am a busy business 
man. If Wellesley seems important 
enough for me to leave my business to 
talk about it, you may be sure it is 
worth talking about." 

Of all the publicity stories which 
Miss MacAlarney, the efficient and 
clever head of the publicity committee, 
has been instrumental in spreading, 
perhaps the two most popular have 
been in regard to the sneeze closet 
and the physics course relating to the 
mechanism of the gas engine. The 
latter has been particularly success- 
ful as shown by the fact that several 
auto firms have sent contributions to 
the course. Headquarters has not yet 
been inundated with camphor pills 
and handkerchiefs as a result of the 
stories about the prophylactic room, 
but doubtless these perquisites will be 
forthcoming. Any student with sim- 
ilar publicity ideas is invited to sub- 
mit them to Emma MacAlarney, 275 
Lexington Ave., New York. 

On St. Patrick's Day there will be 
a big campaign mass meeting in Col- 
lege Chapel, attended by delegations 
from New York and other points. This 
will be the last official fanfare before 
Easter vacation on the 24th, and it is 
hoped that enough enthusiasm will be 
unloosed to bring in a sum that will 
make the government debt look like 
an ant hill. 

To date 30% of 10,000 have been 
heard from with a pledge of $500,000. 
Now the question arises, what will, 
the remaining 70% do? The general 
feeling is that it will demonstrate that 
the last shall be first and make the 
initial donors look well to their lau- 
rels. 

Hetty Wheeler was the early bird 
in reporting everybody in her district 
canvassed with more than her quota. 
Queery, did she dazzle her prey with 
song or statistics? 

On March 7, the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict reported $2f)l,000. 

On March 6, the statement for all 
districts reads: $548,027.37. 



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THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



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THE* PARLIAMENT* OF* FOOLS 



MID YEARS FOR THE FACULTY 



The mid year number of the Mount 
Holyoke News, contained many sug- 
gestions for the revision of examina- 
tions. Unlike the present system, it 
does not relegate the faculty to the 
ranks of the unexamined. 



FACULTY EXAMINATION 

"1. Outline the least offensive meth- 
od of conducting chapel service, in- 
cluding the following points: 

a. Nineteen fresh and original meth- 

ods of introducing the Lord's 
Prayer and your personal theories 
as to how often the congregation 
may be induced to repeat said 
prayer in one service. 

b. Demonstration by the use of dia- 

gram of the best means of shut- 
ting off a speaker at 8.55 sharp. 

c. Discussion of the maintenance of 

composure under the following 
circumstances: dog fight in the 
vestibule, hiccoughing of the organ, 
total absence of the senior class, 
sophomore falling over balcony 
railing. 

II. Make a rough estimate of the num- 
ber of times you have inscribed, in 
quiz books and papers, the following 
comments, and, if possible, explain 
wh&t they mean: 

Well written, forceful, entertaining, 
vigorous, colorful, pleasing, vague, 
inadequate, slipshod. 

III. Compile a syllabus for the study 
of Saturday night chaperoning as a 
science, include a complete survey of 
the modern dances, the|: development 
and probable origin: qualifications for 
an ideal chaperon; methods of dis- 
criminating between the toddle and 
the camel walk; and a discussion of 
cheek-to-cheek versus chin-to-ear." 



(Continued from page 1, col. 3) 

girl, told that most inconclusive of all 
stories, "Zanzibar," at the beginning 
of the performance and again was still 
telling it at the end. 

Freshman year was typified by the 
rah-rah spirit; Sophomore year by 
Tree Day dancing. The absolute med- 
iocrity of the dancing showed the 
heights to which the average girl is 
supposed to rise in achieving her am- 
bition of physical grace. Junior year 
the student had reached comedy, and, 






A NOVELTY! SILHOUETTES 

Send them as Easter cards. Watch our window for samples. 

SPECIAL SALE 

of Parchment shades with Wellesley Seal. They make appropriate gifts 
for teachers, graduates, and undergraduates. 

SUE RICE STUDIO 

10 Grove St. 



finally in her senior year she appreci- 
ated tragedy. The play failed utterly. 
The lines of the medium, Carr Igle- 
hart which carried the explanation of 
the action, were unintelligible to the 
audience. The symbolism was far- 
fetched and obscure, and would have 
been unpopular even if understood, 

Most of all, the performance failed 
because if its lack of dramatic imag- 
ination. It was unfortunately, pain- 
fully consistent in its symbolism. It 
was intended to represent the medi- 
ocrity of the college girl's attainment. 
To carry ou this theme the most bor- 
ing of scenes were acted before the 
audience. The whole situation was 
chaos and confusion to the spectators, 
and although the intention was excel- 
lent, the play fell short in execution. 

'23 and '24 both presented interest- 
ing and well acted plays. The scen- 
ery added effectiveness to the Sopho- 
more Pierrot and Columbine fantasy. 
The details of "The Trials of a Hos- 
tess" were extremely well worked out, 
as each part afforded a good opportun- 
ity for characterization. Katherine 
Brown made a delightful Bridget,, just 
over from Ireland. Grace Hayward, 
as the hostess, sustained her part ad- 
mirably. 

The Barn was honored by the pres- 
ence of some of the foremost stars of 
the stage and screen, who acted as 
judges of the performances. Sarah 
Bernhardt (Hazel Aaron, '21), who in- 
troduced the four plays, entered upon 
the arm of Caruso (Connie White- 
more, '21). As a great favor, the lat- 
ter sang before his first audience since 
his illness. Heifitz (Helen Wilson, 
'24), played an original interpretation 
of "Palesteena," Fanny Brice (Bessie 
Rand, '21), Al Jolson (Dorothy 
Weil, '22), sang some familiar songs, 
and Theda Bara (Helen Miller, '21), 
sang "The Land of the Sky Blue Wa- 
ter" with illustration. The other 
judges were Dorothy Gish (Mary 
Dooly, '21), Lenore Ulric, (Ruth Ped- 
erson, '23), Charlie Chaplin (Hal 
Kirkham, '22), and Mary Pickford 
(Mildred Hesse, '21). 

Mr. Gragham (Mary O'Keefe, 21), 
was on hand to photograph all the cel- 
ebrities. A reporter for the "Tran- 
script" (Betty Sayre, '21), ably assist- 
ed him by pointing out the notable 
ones. A "Townsman" reporter (Ruth 
Metzger, '21), followed in their wake. 
Throughout the evening, election re- 
turns were received on the platform 
at the rear of the Barn. Among the 
announcements was the news that Mr. 
English had been nominated for Pres- 
ident of the Barnswallows. 



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Room 212, Colonial Building 

100 Boylston Street 

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and 
FRAME SHOP 

— GEAGHAN 

Just Received 

A NEW LINE 



£ Gifts 



Cards 

Novelties 



Where? 
Ye Corner Shoppe 

Wellesley Ave. and Atwood St. 

Crepe de Chine 

GOWNS 

Glove Silk Underwear 

Lovely Camisoles and 

Chemises 

Dancing and Dress 

Corsets 
Fine Silk Hosiery 

jfWabamt OTfittnep's; 

up one flight, The Waban Bldg. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



PRESIDENT NEILSON ANALYSES 

SHAKESPEARE'S PHILOSOPHY 

OF LIFE 



President William Allen Neilson of 
Smith College delivered an annual 
Shakespeare Lecture in the Memorial 
Chapel, Friday evening, March 11. 
The lecture, which was scheduled for 
Billings Hall, was transferred to the 
Chapel, since Billings proved inade- 
quate for the large audience which de- 
sired to hear the distinguished Shakes- 
peare scholar. 

President Neilson took as his sub- 
ject the question of "Religion in 
Shakespeare.' Criticism of Shakes- 
peare's violations of the classical uni- 
ties, which he had no intention of fol- 
lowing. Today, criticism attacks the 
intellectual content rather than the 
form of his works," Mr. Neilson 
quoted George Santayana as starting 
the widely-held opinion that Shakes- 
"peare in the eighteenth century," ho 
said, "concerned itself with Shakes- 
quoted George Santayana as stating 
ligion, was in fact, merely holding a 
mirror to society. 

In disproving this opinion, Mr. Neil- 
son pointed out that the religious ideas 
which Shakespeare's characters ex-, 
press must not be regarded as Shakes- 
peare's own. It is poor criticism to 
infer his religious ideas from such 
speeches as that of Henry V. before 
the battle of Agincourt, for the 
prayer not only is too barbaric for 
Shakespeare but lacks his profundity 
as well. Again in the speech after 
the battle the ideas are taken from 
Holinshed and are not contributions of 
Shakespeare. Isabella in "Measure 



for Measure" is the only truly reli- 
gious character in Shakespeare, and is 
the most popular. However, the ab- 
sence of passages expressing Shakes- 
peare's religious ideas does not indi- 
cate that he had none- Again and 
again he puts into the mouths of his 
characters speeches which show his 
sympathy with such ideas. 

Conclusions as to Shakespeare's 
philosophy of life may be reached by 
studying the types which occur fre- 
quently in his plays. By what a man 
speaks, you can learn those principles 
which bring pattern into the chaos of 
life." The sentimentalist type recurs 
constantly in the early plays — the 
type which cherishes emotion for its 
own sake, not for for the object of its 
emotion. Romeo has a touch of this 
ailment in his early affair with Ros- 
aline; Constance in "King John" is 
"as fond of grief as of her son;" Or- 
sino, throughout "Twelfth Night" de- 
liberately ministers to his emotion 
which flourishes best in the absence of 
its object, Richard XI composes poet- 
ry while the enemy marches nearer. 

That Shakespeare does not use ro- 
mantic love merely as a mainspring of 
plots but does attempt to show its sig- 
nificance in human life is best shown 
by "Romeo and Juliet." In those twc 
and in "Macbeth" we find the only in- 
stances where character is developed 
as well as unfolded during the play. 
Brookes' "Romeo and Juliet" which 
was Shakespeare's main source, is a 
lesson against immoderate passion re- 
sulting in degradation. Shakespeare, 
however, has taken the same theme 
and shown that passion was the 
agency in transforming both Romeo 



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and Juliet into finer people. On the 
other hand, in Antony, love is the 
means of his spiritual degeneration. 

Mr. Neilson's last argument was 
based on Shakespeare's treatment of 
the three types of tragic catastrophe. 
In the first the hero meets his death 
as the result of his own wrong doing 
— a death of both body and soul. 
"Romeo and Juliet" best illustrates 
the second type where death comes as 
a result of the character's defiance of 
social conditions, which yet were 
stronger than they. But death here 
is only physical. The third type, as in 
"Lear" is that in which no apparent 
discrimination is made between the 
good and the bad. In reality, Shakes- 
peare is showing that death is not the 
ultimate disaster; that both Lear and 
Cordelia were spiritually triumphant. 
"Whether this proves that Shakes- 
peare had a religion," said Mr. Neil- 
son, "depends upon the definition one 
gives to religion. But Shakespeare 
does not leave life without a meaning. 
He is not philosophically incoherent." 

E. A. '22 



WELLESLEY DEBATERS READY 



The speakers for the Debate on Sat- 
urday evening will be as follows: 

At Wellesley At Barnard 

Eliz. Woody '22 Eliz. Sanford '23 

Emily Gordon '22 Katherine Cook '22 
Eleanor Burch '21 Marion Perrin '22 

The team will leave for Barnard 
Friday morning, accompanied by Mrs. 
Mabel E. Hoddard, and Ada Haesler, 
Chairman of Debate. 



CAMPAIGN NOTE 



It will be noted that Texas and Ok- 
lahoma, two of our richest states have 
so far subscribed only $50. Surely 
the girls of this section will see to it 
that donations of a few paying oil 
wells and cattle ranches come in so 
speedily that they will be in the class, 
with the tailor soliciting work from 
the family quite satisfied with its own 
tailor. "But, listen," said the man, 
"your tailor may be good, but I know 
he's not so good- as I am — nor so swift, 
either, yet. Why I am so swift, lady, 
that the clothes when I bring back are 
still warm." 



T£. Altman & Ok 



NEW YORK 



will hold an interesting 



FASHION EXHIBIT 



at the Wellesley Inn 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

on Monday and Tuesday 
March 21st and 22nd 



Misses and Young Women's 

Frocks, Suits, Coats, Hats, Blouses and all the essentials 
of dress, for the Spring and Summer seasons, are included 
in the assortments. 



INSPECTION IS CORDIALLY INVITED 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 





GIRDLE 



PATENTED 



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—is the Ideal Corset for College Girls 



7* 



HE TREO GIRDLE is made entirely of porous 
woven surgical elastic web, which "gives" freely 
to every movement of the body, yet firmly 
holds the figure. Lends grace with absolute 
comfort. Our patented method of construction 
and character of materials used make it equally 
desirable for street, dancing, evening or sport 
wear; white or flesh tint. Price $2.00 to Si 5.00. 

CAUTION— The TREO GIRDLE has feature strip of elastic above 
elastic waist-line band, and, therefore, supports the body above 
and below waist-line. If not at your dealer s, write for Free Booklet. 

TREO COMPANY, Inc. 

160-X Fifth Avenue, New York City 



gUumnae ©ept. 



Alumnae and former students are urged to 
co-operate in making this department imtar- 
esting, by sending all notices promptly to 
Alumnae Office, Wellesley (College) Mass. 



ENGAGED 



'20 Ethel Davis to Richard Phillip 
Herzfield, Wisconsin. '20. 

'16 Miriam I. Dean to Robert D. 
Everhart of Norfolk, Va. 

'19 Mary E. Long to Clarence L. 
Buzby of Philadelphia. 

'19 Susan C. Hall to George Mun 
roe Chamberlin of Elbridge, N. Y. 



MARRIED 



'16 Louise Curtis to Dr. Howard H. 
Heuston, January 12, at Decatur, Ill- 
inois. At home, Boulder, Colorado. 

'20 Doras Palmer to Ernest Webster 
Jackson, February 24, at Sharon, Pa. 
At home. Suite 18, the Narconia, Som- 
erville, Mass. 



BORN 



'08 To Maude (Huff) Young, a son, 
Richard Weston, February 24, 

'15 To Marguerite (Whitmarsh) 
Holman, a son, Stuart Whitmarsh, De- 
cember 3, 1920. 

'16 To Elizabeth (Mason) Briggs, 
a son, Le Baron Russell, 3rd, March 
9, at Bangor, Maine. 



DIED 

'93 Arthur John Newman, father of 
Caroline M. Newman, December 15, in 
Shreveport, La., and Arthur Brantley 
Newman, her only brother, on Janu- 
ary 13. 

'15 Stuart Whitmarsh Holman, in- 
fant son of Marguerite (Whitmarsh) 
Holman, December 14, 1920. 

'19 Walter B. Peabody, father of 
Gretchen Peabody, March 7, in Waban, 
Mass. 

'19 Mrs. Jamie Patton Brenizei, 
mother of Marguerite Brenizer, Feb- 
ruary 8, atChattanooga, Tenn. 



Jean (Winslow) Carroll, '10, of 113 
Seeman St., Durham, N. C, will take 
orders for knitting socks, sweaters, or 
afghans, the proceeds to go to the 
Semi-Centennial Fund. She can make 
a carriage cover 30 x 36 inches in thir- 
ty-six hours and charges $2.50 for this 
work plus the cost of materials. Ap- 
ply to Mrs. Carroll for further details. 



COLLEGE NOTE 



The Prize Debate on Saturday af- 
ternoon was won by Elizabeth Woody. 
'22. She was awarded the cup and 
twenty dollars in gold. 



Special Prices Watches, American Made 
Diamonds and Jewelry Watches Repaired 

J. H. PETERSON 

WATCHMAKER 

170 East Central St. 
Tel. Nat. 458-J Natick, Mass. 



"Great oaks from little acorns grow" The dollars from these soap cakes flow 

for 

THE WELLESLEY SEMI- CENTENNIAL FUND 

ACORN SOAP 
Jave you a cake of Acorn soap in your room ? 
It not only floats but it iasfs. Wonderful for your complexion. 

Watch it lather in hard water. Don't go to the village for your soap. 

'ome to the Alumnae Office and get 



ACORN SOAP 



2 cakes 25c. 



9 cakes $1.00. 




G)rrect Fas/i/onf for Im/nen afyuisses. 

372-378 Boylj(on Sireef Bojton_4'Iaj-j-acWetti 



8 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



CALENDAR 



March 18, 4:40 P. M., Founders 
Hall — Address by Dr. Queen, Director 
of Boston School of Social Work, and 
by Miss Wheeler., Supervisor of Field 
Work. Subject, Opportunities for 
Women in Medical Social Service 
Work. 7:30 to 9:30 P. M. Whitin Ob- 
servatory will be open to all members 
of the college. 8:00 P. M. Billings 
Hall. Address by Professor Charles 
A. Dinsmore of Yale University. Sub- 
ject, Dante: the Man and His Message. 

March 19, 7:30 P. M.— The Barn, 
Intercollegiate Debate. Last day of 
exhibition of Industrial Housing in 
America at Farnsworth Museum. 

March 20, 11:00 A. M.— Chapel, 
Preacher, Dr. Charles A. Dinsmore of 
Yale University. 7:30 P. M. Vesper 
service. Address by Dr. John L. El- 
liott. Subject, Trying to get to the 
Bottom of Reconstruction. 

March 21, 4-5:30 P. M., Founders 
Hall — Conferences concerning the 
teaching profession for seniors, jun- 
iors, and sophomores. For details see 



SHORTHAND 
SYSTEM 

IN TEN 
EASY LESSONS 

This course covers ten easy lessons which will 
tenable the Student, Professor, Journalist, Doc- 
tor, Lawyer or anyone seeking a professional 
career, to go thru life with 100 per cent effi- 
cient. 



class boards. 4-5:30 P. M. Whitin 
Observatory will be open to officers 
and instructors. 8:00 P. M- Billings 
Hall, Address by Dr. D. G. Hogarth. 
Subject, The Hittites in Asia M*mor. 

March 22, 4:40 P. M., Billings Hall, 
Piano Recital by Miss Blanche Brock- 
lebank of the Music Department. 
7:30 P. M. Shakespeare House, Ad- 
dress by Countess Fanny Wilamo- 
witz-Moellendorff. Subject, Condition 
of Women in Europe after the War. 

March 23 — No meeting of C. A. 

March 24 — Recess begins at 12:30 
P. M. 



Wonderful 
Shoes 



FOR 



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Is short and inexpensive, and is given with 
a montly back guarantee if not satisfied. 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TODAY 

PYRAMID PRESS: PUBLISHERS 
1416 Broadway, 
New York City 

Gentlemen : — Enclosed herewith is $5.00 for 
which kindly send me your shorthand course 
in ten easy lessons by mail. It is understood 
that at the end of five days, I am not satis- 
fied my money will be gladly refunded. 



Name 

Street 

City and State 



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Gray Suede 
Brown Suede 
Black Satin 
Tan Russia Calf 
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Baby Louis Heels 

In our new second floor department 



THE 
WELLESLEY NATIONAL BANK 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

The faculty and students of Wellesley College are 
invited to avail themselves of the privileges and services 
offered by this Bank, and the officers and employees are 
ever ready to render any assistance possible in connection 
with banking matters. 



C. N. TAYLOR, President BENJ. H. SANBORN, V.-President 

LOUIS HARVEY, Cashier 
Savings Department Safe Deposit Boxes 




FRANK BROTHERS 

Fifth Avenue Boot Shop 

Near Forty-Eighth Street, New York 

Boots, Slippers, Hosiery for Men, 

Women and Children 



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Whitney Building 

133 Geary Street 




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MADAME WHITNEY 




DON'T MISS 

"CONRAD 
IN QUEST OF HIS YOUTH" 



A BUSTER KEATON COMEDY 

"NEIGHBORS" 



NEWS MAGAZINE 



WELLESLEY 
COMMUNITY 
PLAYHOUSE 



Admission for School Children at 

FRIDAY MATINEE 15c 

MARCH 18-19 



Silken Wool Zephyr 

Light Weight Yarn for Summer 

Sweaters 

Superior Quality of Ango-Fleece 

The delicate color tones found 

only in this brand 

1 Ounce Balls 45c. 

Five balls will make you a sweat- 
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The Yarn Shop 

12 Brook St. 

First Street to the Right 
Beyond the Square